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The Social Super Bowl

Last Sunday saw the 48th Super Bowl in America, and arguably even more anticipated than the game itself, is the half time show and advertising. Brands this year were spending around $4million for a 30 second advert, and for many of these adverts, the message was engaging with fans via social media.

Of the 52 adverts shown nationally, 26 of them involved Twitter (mostly mentioning hashtags to follow and join in on) while just 4 of these mentioned Facebook, a decline from last year where both platforms were mentioned in 8 adverts. With no mentions for Google+ and only one for YouTube and Instagram (although a very successful advert from quick thinking Oreo), is Twitter emerging as the front runner in social media?

There were over 24million tweets related to the Super Bowl this year, the highest number to date and three times higher than last year’s, it was also more than twice the number of tweets sent across the whole of Euro 2012 which at the time broke the record for the highest number of tweets sent per second during the final.

Although programmes are increasingly using hashtags, TV advertising in the UK tends to encourage viewers to visit their Facebook page. Despite this, a recent report on eConsultancy suggests that while Facebook generates more website traffic, it is Twitter that encourages more leads through sales and enquiries.

Last year it was reported that the USA had over 22million active Twitter users while the UK had almost 7million. This compares to Facebook which claims to have 163million users in America and 32million in the UK. With Twitter users increasing by 40% in the last six months and reports of an increase in users leaving Facebook, is it time that brands in the UK started to follow suit and focus more on Twitter than Facebook?

Our favorite adverts from the Super Bowl:

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